Saturday, September 15, 2007

Anime World Order Show # 59 - This is Why All the Robots Cry

Is time and space broken, or have the cartoons driven us crazy? Daryl's reviewing the historic anime anthology Robot Carnival, Gerald talks about the historical business manga Project X: Cup Noodle, and Clarissa makes AWO history by talking about When They Cry: Higurashi.

Longest podcast blog post ever? Possibly. This episode ran long, so we split it in two.

Click Here to Download Part 1 - Intro and News


Click Here to Download Part 2 - Reviews


Timecodes for Part 1 are as follows:

Introduction (0:00 - 38:22)
In a bit of a departure from our typical scope, Gerald was sent a copy of the live-action independent film Big Dreams, Little Tokyo to check out. Somehow we ended up talking a lot about Lost in Translation instead, though Daryl was far more inclined to turn the discourse towards Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai, despite the fact that Ghost Dog was in fact hiding under the SINK, not the toilet as he stated. This is the price we pay for not owning our own copies of Branded to Kill. Is there a quotable sound bite that can be salvaged from this and put up in their Reviews and Links page? PERHAPS.

13:45 - Daryl relates his experience with attending Dragon*Con, its podcasting track, and the Parsec Awards. Considering that the sample nomination Daryl submitted consisted primarily of his scene for scene description of MD Geist, actually winning this award was not really the stated objective of attending this convention. What was? Contrary to what that song from Cheers said, sometimes you want to go where NOBODY knows your name. After being in the vicinity of the gods of podcasting--who are all quite normal, down-to-earth folks despite their penchant for filking--it's probably safe to say that we won't be making any waves in the "podcastosphere" anytime soon since "nobody in their right mind would listen to a podcast that's several hours long and released every week/every other week." Fortunately for us, otaku are the opposite of people in their right mind!

18:47 - Oh yeah, reading emails and playing voicemails! Remember that? We talk about the Trials and Tribulation / Heartache and Frustration involved in becoming an anime translator, then Erin from the Ninja Consultant podcast calls in to talk about the finer points of theatrical film distribution, which prompts a mention of the Anime Bento Festival's one day theatrical showings of anime. Want to see more anime released in movie theaters? Having these succeed would be a good start. In the "what do we think about..." category of emails which constitutes a good deal of the emails we get, we're asked our thoughts on Ninja Nonsense aka 2x2 Shinobuden.

We wrap things up by stating that we're going to move away from doing full reviews of titles which we haven't seen in their entirety, so from now on when we get Volume 1 of something, we'll just talk about it briefly for a few minutes either at the beginning or ending of the show. Otherwise, we'll never get through all this stuff! Also, in case you haven't heard, the iTunes Music Store has put up for sale a variety of series by Tezuka Productions, such as the 1980s Astro Boy, the 1990s Black Jack OAVs, and the 2004 Phoenix TV series that is set to be released by Media Blasters soon. Best of all, they're really cheap!

Let's News! (38:22 - 1:23:03)
Some more details and clarifications have surfaced since we recorded this, but the main news is that ADV is taking over all of Geneon's sales, marketing, and distribution. A lot of what we said in the show isn't entirely spot-on since the original ICv2 article as well as ANN were down at the time of recording, but it's still true that a substantial amount of Geneon has ceased to be. They're presumably still going to be around as far as licensing and production goes, but this feels a lot like when EA acquired Origin Systems. To this day, Daryl continues to bear a grudge towards them (and the entire MMO genre) for the cancellation of Privateer 3 and the two Wing Commander titles that should've come out after Wing Commander: Prophecy. In another cost-cutting measure, even English dubbing is being outsourced/relocated to China and there's only one anime series remaining that is still using cel animation. Can all of these acquisitions and cost-cutting measures really be good in the long run? We're skeptical. Also, Odex has been trying to extract money from people who download anime in Singapore; here is a short summary. Here is a posting about a guy who can't even import Region 2 DVDs to Singapore without them being confiscated by MDA. To see the exact letter that's being sent along with the rest of the links, click here. That thread may not be viewable to the public due to being archived or whatever soon, though.

Promo: Soccergirl, Inc (1:23:03 - 1:23:50)
Daryl found out about this show because Ichigo from Anime-Pulse is a fan of it, but he never could make sense out of it. After meeting her at DragonCon at 2:00 AM on Saturday and getting a Kim Jong-Il bumper sticker, he can only conclude that the widespread success of this program is that it is, in fact, a high-concept cult of personality. Also, filking. The possibility of shooting her with a clown pistol was considered, but the comedy of that is completely invalidated if you shoot a total stranger. That would just get you beaten up by large, imposing filking machines, the Browncoats, and an army of Beta Clones. Did we mention she won the Joe Murphy Memorial Award? As otaku we're fated to die young as Joe did, only there won't be anyone to mourn our deaths since being a self-proclaimed Expert of Anime is a lot like being an Expert of Justice.

...wait, they wanted us to put those Parsec badge images they sent us on our website? Daryl thought you were supposed to print it out and put it on his physical DragonCon badge. Oops!

Timecodes for Part 2:

Review: Robot Carnival (4:04 - 49:30)
This was the very first thing Justin Sevakis wrote about for his Buried Treasure column at ANN, so Daryl was outclassed from the start, not even bothering to state the original Japanese titles. This movie has largely been discussed to death over the last twenty years and we have little that is original or insightful to add (here's a fanzine article from 1991), but all Daryl ever does is steal other people's ideas and present them as his own anyway.

Promo: Anime Pacific (49:30 - 50:30)
See how this promo is just an excerpt from their show of them talking about something silly (although in this case, unrelated to what the show itself is about)? That's the kind of promos we need. Lots of. Except we're too lazy to ever actually listen to our own show. That's where YOU come in!

Review: Project X: Nissin Cup Noodle (50:30 - 1:04:03)
Not to be confused with Cup Nude (probably not work safe), this is a true story of personal prevalance and triumph...except when it comes to people in America actually BUYING this thing. Gerald reviews one of the few business manga to be released in English (along with the manga about the history of 7-11 and the one about the Datsun Fairlady Z), but for whatever reason, the average US manga reader is simply not interested in manga about how to shift consumer habits. This one's a historical biography of Momofuku Andou released by DMP. Daryl really, really wants the manga DMP released where ASTRO BOY IS IN THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK, but he has never been able to physically see it. Fortunately, Amazon has it. Also, Astro Boy tells the biography of Helen Keller. And Beethoven. And Einstein, which is not on Amazon. Someday when we have money again, these are all getting bought.

Promo: Dave and Joel's Fast Karate For the Gentleman (1:04:03 - 1:05:07)
See these guys? Their listeners love these guys. Make them promos all the time. And fanart and stuff. Probably because unlike us, the people they personally know listen to their podcast. And that picture of Gerald up above? Yeah, they made that too and never sent it to us until recently. We should get more of this stuff (and remember to actually post it), unless the secret to engaging such levels of fan interaction requires having forums.

Review: When They Cry: Higurashi (1:05:07 - 1:23:50)
Clarissa submits to repeated listener requests to review this series. It's moe horror, which is generally a redundant term only this one has graphic violence. Nothing makes otaku want to protect the cute girls (and buy the full set of dakimakura) more than seeing them make crazy, deranged, contorted faces and murder each other over and over again. BAD END after BAD END results, though not all of them involve angrily severing your penis with a pair of scissors. We lost that picture but don't really feel like asking for it in /r/ since it would require monitoring 4chan for an extended period of time. That place moves too fast to keep up.

You have nothing to fear about this podcast becoming overrun by the immortal enemy that is moe just because we talked about Higurashi...OR DO YOU?
Oh snap! Time to restore the balance, Gerald style!
Closing (1:23:50 - 1:29:05)
For our next trick and the coveted Show 60 milestone, we're talking entirely about Osamu Tezuka. DEAL WITH IT. Daryl will be talking about (can't even really call it a review) Astro Boy, specifically the three anime incarnations of the "Birth of Astro Boy" storyline as taken from the 60s version of Astro Boy, the 80s version, and the 2003 one. Gerald will review Vertical Inc's latest Tezuka offering Apollo's Song, and--prompted by the iTunes Music Store releases--Clarissa faces her fears and reviews the Black Jack OAVs/movie from the 1990s that Osamu Dezaki and Akio Sugino worked on.

We've already recorded Show 60. You thought THIS episode ran long...


112 comments:

Erwin Rosales said...

I am pretty sure you guys will never become moe. And if you all do I will just have to haunt you all down.

Anonymous said...

So I finally saw Transformers, and I ended up laughing at the serious parts, and not the parts which were meant to be funny. I think it's because I saw Team America. I used to think the latter film was just a parody of Bay's style, but it's really a fucking thesis!

Jaime/Karasuhebi said...

"Clarissa makes AWO history by talking about When They Cry: Higurashi."

No the real history made in this episode is that I finally got one of my crappy e-mails read on the show. After more than half a year of e-mailing you guys with the most random shit ever, I finally get one of my e-mails read. I felt so special. :-D

Funny thing about that is, when you guys were reading that e-mail, I didn't even remember I had sent it. lol Why did I send that anyways? I think it's because there was like a sale on RightStuf or something and I needed to know really quick if it was any good so I could buy it. Obviously the sale is over now, but thanks for taking the time to read and answer the e-mail anyways. I look forward to your review of Ninja Nonsense.

Like I said, thanks again for reading my e-mail you guys (and gal); It made me feel special, even though it was only for about a minute or so.

-Jaime

P.S: Gerald and Clarissa, I will probably be going to Waterford Lakes for the anime movie screenies. Are you guys going to be there?

David said...

Ghost Dog Daryl?

now I got to watch it again

Craig said...

Yeah, Odex are real mistake makers, and the joke is that whilst those dubs are fairly pathetic, they're still more watchable than your standard 4kids fare and I would be more than happy to cough up £25rrp (The magic Naruto Boxset Price) for a half season of uncut dubbed Yugioh Duel Monsters or Digimon Adventure.

But Of course, they seem more content in suing the arse out of Singapore.

I meen, comeon, NCH is there, you don't want to hurt the homland of that guy, he did 4chan city for goodness sake.

Pixy Misa said...

Speaking of the evil that is moe, I'd love to hear your opinion on two moe shows currently airing in Japan. One is Moetan - it even has moe in the name! And the other is Potemayo, which while not having moe in its name, was originally serialised in something called Moeyon.

I'll just say that I adore one and loathe the other. Both are available in the usual places (cough AnimeSuki cough). I know these aren't your usual fare, but that's why I'm interested in your thoughts.

James Leung-Man-Fai said...

Clarissa. If you are looking for a Dell laptop without Vista, they are still available through the Dell website. Dell just makes it difficult for "home" consumers to find them.

First, look under the small business section of the website. Small businesses made the biggest stink about the Vista OS. Try looking under the business section of the Dell website.

Another place to look is the Dell Outlet. Last time I checked, they still offered XP OS with their laptops. If you don't mind refurb. laptops, you can get a pretty good deal on a low to mid ranged laptop. Here is the URL:

www.dell.com/outlet/

I hope this helps.

Behonkiss said...

Something that I'm surprised wasn't mentioned is that with Phoenix on iTunes, you can buy a bundle of the whole series for 10 DOLLARS. I liked the first episode, so I'll splurge later today.

Also, I hope that rapeface Gerald picture keeps showing up randomly until the end of time.

David said...

Speaking of the evil that is moe, I'd love to hear your opinion on two moe shows currently airing in Japan. One is Moetan - it even has moe in the name!

I downloaded the first episode, just because I was curious... (1080p anime rip?--HAHA oh wow)

Ink--no matter what you say, your >10 years old.. plus that Duck is definitely pedo.. in fact this hole thing has lolicon written all over it.

Daryl should watch it (kekekekeke)

Régis said...

In response to your discussion on Sazae-san and cels versus digital, I think there are some misconceptions about what digital animation is and isn't and whether that applies to the Sazae-san scenario. Before I get to the details, in general, I'd say that this is basically the same issue Rym and Scott of GeekNights have regarding vinyl lovers versus everyone else when it comes to music, and that is that no matter what, vinyl is clearly inferior.

Now, I have worked with cels and animation cranes, some 3D CG animation, 2D digital (as in scanned drawings) and 2D vector drawings, also known as Flash animation. The note you make about cels having the artist's sensibility that you see in the old animation, the so-called "warm-flicker" as described in the story, can still be seen in hand-drawn animation, whether shot under the camera or with scanned drawings. Daryl brought up the example of Princess Mononoke and how it used both, and I'll add to say that even though all anime since has gone digital, the reason why there is such a disparity of quality has far more to do with the art directors and directors than with the tools used - for instance, I think many of the Shotaro Ishinomori shows like Cyborg 009 and Kikaider take a lot more digital shortcuts and look more "digital" then shows like Mushishi, Kemonozume, Denno Coil, or the OAV Nasu: Summer of Andalucia. The Girl Who Leapt Through Time is another example which is all digital, and yet, the drawings were all scanned in and have the human sensibility you talk about.

From personal experience though I cannot understand why someone would still use cels when from a purists perspective, the method of scanning in drawings remains even closer to the animators hands (there are less clean-up artists in between as opposed to the mechanical cel method) and hence closer to that sensitivity. My guess is that Sazae-san, being such an old show, has a method that works, and I'll presume that the artists working on it are more used to that method, especially if some of them have been with the show as long as it has aired, than with the digital compositing method. So, the case may be that it is far more cost effective to keep things as they are than to change the whole pipeline of a show like that, which as far as I know is even simpler than Chibi-Maruko Chan, and probably has very simple animation that doesn't require thousands of drawings per episode, or intricate camera moves and such.

For a better explanation on how animation works in Japan, check out the Anipages Daily BBS, on the Japanese Animation Theory thread, and many of your questions and concerns will be answered. I know mine were.

TJ said...

Holy crap guys, this is probably the most interesting show you guys have released in a while. And I haven't even heard the reviews yet!!

First order of business, the ADV/Geneon controversy. I agree that nothing good can possibly come from doing this. I was reading a Hey Answerman responce about this very subject, and Mr Answerman brought up an interesting point. Geneon was apparently a major factor in bringing over a lot of big Japanese guests to America for convention appearances and such. So with this controversy with ADV, it doesn't look like that'll happen anymore. Which sucks big time. Secondly, I'm pretty sure that ADV isn't gonna try to be the EA of the anime world. In this case, it seems more like Geneon went to ADV for their help rather than ADV making the first move. Unlike the people at Odex, ADV actually seems like decent human beings, and not like people that would try to monopolize the industry.

Wow, great transition. Odex. Yeah. These guys just seem like terrible, awful human beings. You're right, this just makes me want to go and download more anime just to mock them. I was just on Wikipedia reading up on this, and apparently they've been sending those letters to fans as young as 9 years old. That's scary. I'm 17; I can't even afford to pay for the new Wings Of Honneamise DVD. So, this whole thing has made me a bit paranoid. I just hope it ends soon, and Odex gets what they deserve.

Wow, this is a long comment for just two points.

-TJ

A. Mesenbrink said...

Great show, the ADV Geneon news and the piracy lawsuits.

I know I'm not the average anime customer, married 37 year old with 2 kids. I very rarely buy new anime. Most of my media purchases are used. Having been burned so many times by not getting full releases or shows that look great turn out to be crap, I've learned my lesson. I wait until I can buy a full series then find it as cheap as possible. I bought the first Gundam series for about $50 a year ago. The problem with this is anime companies get none of this money. They don't see the sale at all. I want to support shows I like I just can't bring myself to spend the money.

The point was made in this episode that everyone in the US is use to "season" releases of TV shows. This is true. Now most of these are $29 - $50 for season for network TV. Some shows command a higher price, HBO stuff, Star Trek, Battlestar Galactica. I think the latter fits anime well.

Wouldn’t a model were the first 13 episodes are released for $40 work? $80 for a 26 episode season seems fair; we are paying $60 for most video games now.

Why do we only get 1 disk at a time? Is it a production issue where they release the first disk to see how it does before they start working on the next? Do they release one disk at a time because they need to recoup money to invest on the production for the second (I can't imagine the margin would be that thin)? Or is the reason we get one disk because they think they could not sell a $60 - $80 season, and $20 - $30 per disk is easier to swallow?

I have the money and would buy anime however my biggest problem is the Single Disks! I run into 2 scenarios:
1. I find Vol. 2, at Best Buy and wait, go home look up Vol. 1, and can order it, but then I have to go to Best Buy and hope Vol. 2 is still there, or order it online as well, then I can’t find Vol. 3. Is it out yet? Did they cancel the show?
2. I find Vol. 1 its $29.99, and 3 episodes. I have $30 but I could buy about 6 used movies for that price, or a used game, or 2 brand new movies, or…

Does anyone agree with me?

Oh really quick on the piracy. I read an article recently, maybe on Arstechnica, the RIAA was recently prevented from these cookie cutter lawsuits without binding evidence that a crime was committed. They are now being told they can’t just file the type of lawsuit you were talking about on the show. Now the RIAA will have to have hard evidence that a crime is committed before they can file the lawsuit.

AWO for president, oh wait you are not all the same person. darn.

A. Mesenbrink said...

OH btw, thanks for talking about the anime on iTunes.

Please everyone that can buy and episode or two, and tell your friends. This is a good thing, and if it works on iTunes we might see more on Amazon Unboxed or Joost or Xbox live.

Yes if you didn't know there is anime on Xbox live now also.

Steve Harrison said...

I am called and I must appear.

I think what killed Geneon was the music arm. J-Pop never took off the way they thought, after all the concerts and tours and pimping the brand. They weren't able to stay ahead of the curve on what soundtracks to license, and I'm guessing they got not a drop of help from the other companies in cross-promotion, as in "buy the show from x, buy the CDs from y!"...remember, ADV tried to do a startup music label as well and like so many efforts, it just vanished.

And this leads into what Daryl was trying to explain- how the death of Musicland Group (Suncoast, MediaPlay and Sam Goody) is still hurting the US anime industry.

I just cannot believe there is NO effect when something on the order of 2000 stores that sell your product vanish. If you factor in the Tower Records bankruptcy and Transworld/ FYE closing some 90 stores at the start of 2007 and sked to close up to 60 more by the end of '07, you're looking at roughly 3000 brick locations gone.

And NOBODY is picking up that slack.

OK, let's do a little math. I'll try and keep it super simple, so to those that know (or think they know) the numbers may seem off, but the logic and process is solid. OK? LET'S GO!

Way way back in the VHS stoneage John O'Donnell of CPM / US Manga Corps did an interview, and put out that he had to sell 5000 units of a title to break even and make some profit. There was no breakdown of the numbers, sub Vs dub, if that was combined or seperate, if the sub VHS might have a lower 'breakeven' number, just 5000 copies to make some money.

so OK, with DVD, we know licensing costs have increased, there's been more advertising, blah blah blah, let's say the number is now 10,000 copies to break even. In the Mainstream Home Video business that's a really low number. Warner Bros probably THREW AWAY 10,000 copies of the last Harry Potter movie that were damaged in shipping. But I shouldn't bring that up, because even the Majors have the BIG titles and other things they figure will only sell 20 k or less.

So, the anime biz, we figure 10 k is the magic number.

Suncost, back in '02, was at over 2000 stores nationwide. Heck, before Best Buy bought them it was projected they'd have over 3000 stores by '03. Anyway, call it 2000 stores, just the one chain. It was common for the home office to order 2 copies minimum of ANY anime title at that time. So, round numbers, Suncoast accounted for 4000 units, or 40% of the needed sales to reach breakeven. 40%, ONE company.

Even with 50% returns for credit, that's a solid sale of 2000 units, or 20%. Between that, Best Buy, Tower, FYE and internet sales, it was a pretty soild lock that EVERYTHING released was going to at least break even. And when you get hits like Cowboy Bebop or Samurai Champloo, it does a good thing for the bottom line.

But look now. With all the closings, if you figure that's 3000 locations selling product gone, that's 6000 units NOT EVEN BEING ORDERED. BY ANYONE.

Granted, I'm sure the online stores have picked up customers, but they're absorbing the stock the stores normally order. I am positive that none of the online retailers have INCREASED their open-to-buy and sinking more money into stock that they can't move.

So, the US anime companies are trying to get by on effectivly 40% of what they need to match the profits from the early 2Ks.

Suncoast used to stock the Geneon music CDs very heavy. We had gotten in special racks for it, and there was that mall tour that Geneon was backing, announced just before the bankruptcy. That must have been a slap in their face.....

That's enough truth for now. I'll do the snarky 'order and return for credit' lecture later.

Chris Sobieniak said...

Thanks for depressing us Steve! It's nice to have a reality check now and then.

Anonymous said...

tj: "First order of business, the ADV/Geneon controversy. I agree that nothing good can possibly come from doing this."

I disagree. A Fushigi Yuugi thin-pack is desperately needed. Plus ADV might be more likely to lean on Bandai Visual to lower its prices than Geneon.

"Geneon was apparently a major factor in bringing over a lot of big Japanese guests to America for convention appearances and such."

And ADV wasn't a factor? They gave us Nabeshin and Buronson, and that's all I need.

"I'm 17; I can't even afford to pay for the new Wings Of Honneamise DVD."

Again, it's $55 on Amazon.

steve: "I think what killed Geneon was the music arm. J-Pop never took off the way they thought, after all the concerts and tours and pimping the brand."

I'm not really surprised. We got plenty of overrated rock groups here. They have to stand out a little more than just being Japanese.

As for the Suncoast and Tower bail-out, well it blows, but doesn't surprise me. None of those fuckers were anywhere near me, and if they're not going to bother competing with Best Buy, what did they expect to happen? Yeah, they were the main distributor for most anime titles for the better part of a decade, but I personally felt the domestic companies should've jumped that ship a while ago-when anime started becoming less niche. I feel bad losing CPM, though, because that means Animeigo's all that's left of the Streamline years, and there's no chance in hell they're gonna make any money off Yawara. At least UY had the possibility of attracting random Inu Yasha and Ranma fans, but people who read Monster are gonna say, "Bah, I'll just get Gantz instead!" But you never know. Maybe Baki and Punch! might give it a new lease on life.

kransom said...

Great show as always, looking forward to the next part. A couple of off-topic things:

1. Daryl, have you watched Shoot 'Em Up yet? I viewed this masterpiece of film theatre and upon leaving the screening, my thoughts were, in order, "THAT WAS SO BAD," "THAT WAS SO GOOD," "HAS DARYL SEEN THIS YET?"

If you have, thoughts? It's almost like what would happen if you picked up some random nerd from the street that had just finished watching some DTV Miike action film like Dead or Alive and told him to make a movie. Oh god, I think I need to watch it again. (For the record, I watched TFatF3: Tokyo Drift in theaters 3 times. No, I don't know what's wrong with me.)

2. Gerald, please don't forget my Musashi DVDs when you go to AWA! I'll finally get to go to Panel of DOOM since they didn't schedule a Smash Brothers tournament that I have to run during it this year, so don't think you can hide from me or something.

Daryl Surat said...

I did indeed see Shoot 'Em Up on the opening weekend, and my Xbox 360 gamercard picture is the proof. Not that I own any GAMES for it since I bought it largely on a whim, just like the PS3 that I bought largely on a whim and have no games for. I have no games because after the HDTV/stand that I bought as well as the bed I bought, I should just not spend any money on recreation for a year. Oh wait, AWA is this week (I should finish my panels!). Then Halo 3 comes out next week. I don't even like Halo, but I'll rent it just so I can play cooperative mode before everyone stops caring about doing that, like how nobody seems to care about Gears of War anymore.

Anyway, I strongly recommend Shoot 'Em Up to anyone who enjoyed Black Lagoon for the correct reasons, which makes the fact that it made absolutely no money whatsoever all the more saddening.

I'm 17; I can't even afford to pay for the new Wings Of Honneamise DVD.

If it's any consolation, I am 27 and can't afford the new Wings of Honneamise release. Even $55 is a whole lot of money for one barebones release of a movie. Bandai Visual sure talks a big game about "Japanese quality releases in America," but I can't help but notice that the Japanese release has extra (useless) stuff that we didn't get. I would have been perfectly happy had they just included everything from the Manga Video release but fixed the video.

They sent me both the Blu-Ray and HD DVD release though, so we'd better review these things. Hmm, Carl Horn will be at AWA and we're already bringing the mixer (that we don't know how to use) to record live interviews...

no matter what, vinyl is clearly inferior.

Patlabor taught me that the superiority of vinyl is that it summons monsters to kill you for listening to vinyl records. It's true that the Ishinomori shows did utilize quite a few digital shortcuts, but at the same time they are from the earlier days of digital animation. More recent shows like the Yasuhiro Imagawa-directed Tetsujin 28 TV series that nobody watched except me (I paid full price for each individual disc to support it and it STILL failed! Lesson learned!) made a concerted effort to NOT look digital. Which kind of reinforces what I said on the show: sure, you CAN pull off the "hand drawn" look using digital animation techniques, but it requires additional time and effort that most aren't willing to invest.

I can't find my Robot Carnival OST. How am I going to preemptively steal the thunder from the upcoming Lather's Blather review of Robot Carnival if I can't have the appropriate BGM playing in the background as I talk about each segment, huh?!

The Moogle Master said...

Bout fucking time! Buy the way, what's a good way to record a podcast. I could transfer my wav files that i recorded with my MP3 player and convert then into MP3s. But the sound... Kinda sucks!

Anonymous said...

daryl: "Anyway, I strongly recommend Shoot 'Em Up to anyone who enjoyed Black Lagoon for the correct reasons, which makes the fact that it made absolutely no money whatsoever all the more saddening."

No one cares about Paul Giamatti. I made a joke comparing him to Jude Law, but it's true.

"If it's any consolation, I am 27 and can't afford the new Wings of Honneamise release. Even $55 is a whole lot of money for one barebones release of a movie."

Yeah, well, the company lost money on it, and most Gainax fans fall asleep during it, so it's a tough sell for people who thought Death Proof was "talky".

"Bandai Visual sure talks a big game about "Japanese quality releases in America," but I can't help but notice that the Japanese release has extra (useless) stuff that we didn't get. I would have been perfectly happy had they just included everything from the Manga Video release but fixed the video."

It could be that Manga still has the rights to those extras... Or maybe they're looking for some excuse to double-dip down the road...

"More recent shows like the Yasuhiro Imagawa-directed Tetsujin 28 TV series that nobody watched except me (I paid full price for each individual disc to support it and it STILL failed! Lesson learned!)"

I've been wanting to get the collection for that one, actually. I'm guessing it failed, because Geneon chose to release the live-action movie first.

Erwin Rosales said...

The best way to get the WOH in DVd or HD-DVD or Blue Ray is to wait for Deepdiscount annual sale :P

That is how I got my Gunbuster DVD set, and thanks to Otaku USA I am thinking on getting Daibuster or Gunbuster 2. But I will wait for the proper AWO review on that one.

By the way everyone should get their hands on the Tetsujin 28 DVD boxset since it is super cheap and awesome.

Well, I better go cry some more after reading Apollo's Song :(

TJ said...

"And ADV wasn't a factor? They gave us Nabeshin and Buronson, and that's all I need. "

True, ADV does good work; Nabeshin and Buronson are awesome guests. But all I'm saying is Geneon did a lot of good work too, and with them gone, we probably are not gonna see as many japanese guests anymore (which sucks, of course).

"If it's any consolation, I am 27 and can't afford the new Wings of Honneamise release. Even $55 is a whole lot of money for one barebones release of a movie."

Thanks Daryl. You're right, $55 is still to much. Maybe if I had a job, but unfortunately that's not working out too well.

Anonymous said...

So AnimeNation linked the Kite Liberator trailer at http://www.kite-liberator.com/streaming/streaming.html
. Apparently, Sawa knows kung fu now.

ScottGreen said...

I'll second the 2004 Imagawa Tetsujin 28 recommendation. It's not a great mecha show, and it's not another Giant Robo, but it is an interestingly direct discussion of post war Japan and the giant robot metaphor.

I'd be curious to see the 2007 animated Tetsujin 28 movie that Imagawa disowned. Too bad it will never be licensed.

Régis said...

You mentioned the newer Tetsujin 28 on the podcast before, and I guess I'll have to check it out eventually. All in all we're on the same page, but I'm just unclear as to why you say that digital animation "requires additional time and effort that most aren't willing to invest" when I don't think it is the time or the effort that people are not willing to invest, but rather the lack of artistry in most animated shows. Having said that, I enjoy watching "analog" works just as much as you do, and some will never be surpassed, but I don't credit that to the fact that they were shot under the crane with cels, in 3D, stop motion or whatever - the credit should go to the artists and not necessarily the medium. So yeah, I guess I just don't get the whole anti-computer attitude.

Daryl Surat said...

So yeah, I guess I just don't get the whole anti-computer attitude.

That is probably because THERE IS NO MOTHERFUCKING ANTI-COMPUTER ATTITUDE TO GET.

I did not say that getting something to look decent via digital animation requires additional time and effort that most aren't willing to invest. In fact, I said THE EXACT OPPOSITE. The part that takes an additional degree of effort and money is taking optional steps to give the digital animation a more hand-drawn look, which most people won't care about anyway. Here's a simplified example:

Let's say a character's got red hair or something. Coloring their hair in via digital coloring requires something basically along the lines of the paint bucket tool. The result is that it all gets colored in uniformly and evenly in the same shade, accomplishing in a few mouse clicks what it used to take someone decidedly longer to hand paint. If the animator was cel painting, they wouldn't be able apply the paint perfectly evenly and have it dry uniformly, and some parts might turn out ever so slightly lighter or darker than others. Repeat that process over all the necessary frames, and you get the aforementioned "warm flicker" effect.

Can you replicate this effect via digital coloring? Yes. Does it require additional steps that need not otherwise be performed? Absolutely. Does it look bad if they don't do these steps? No, but it does look DIFFERENT. Your point that the drawings are scanned in after being hand-drawn doesn't really matter that much because a major part of what makes digital animation look different from traditional animation is the coloring process.

Given enough time and money, you could pull off roughly equivalent looks using whatever tools you wanted, but anime creators don't generally get much of either.

The next person to claim I have some sort of negative bias towards modern animation just because I acknowledge that it's different is getting the hose for not putting the lotion on its skin.

The Last Otaku said...

Daryl, go ahead and watch the new Maison Ikkoku live action. I really liked it. Its so much better than the old one (which is not saying much I know).

Anonymous said...

So according to AOD, Bandai Visual thinks they can charge me $60 more for Jin Roh than I get off Amazon, just because it's in Blu Ray. I don't even like Jin Roh, but I'm tempted to buy the cheaper version, just to flip them off.

Anonymous said...

More recent shows like the Yasuhiro Imagawa-directed Tetsujin 28 TV series that nobody watched except me (I paid full price for each individual disc to support it and it STILL failed! Lesson learned!)

I couldn't help notice your typos, Daryl: the pronouns shold be "us" and "we." I also re-bought the entire series for a friend when RIght Stuf had a $4 Geneon sale. Of course, the fact that the discs were on sale for $4 each is a testament to our failure...

Hell, I even bought the New Getter Robo starter box, but didn't get the other three volumes until that selfsame aforementioned $4 sale. I would have bought the other volumes when they came out, had my local Best Buy carried them, but they never did, and this is not the only series about which I have that complaint. I don't blame Best Buy, though, I blame FUNimation.

For far too long (okay, maybe it wasn't that long, but it sure seemed like it), valuable shelf space that could have gone to subsequent volumes of series I wanted to buy were taken up by FUNi's assinine "Case Closed" boxes--and by "assinine" I'm not referring to the series, which I may have bought had the volumes had at least four episodes per disc, but the manner in which the starter boxes were released. I kind of dislike starter boxes to begin with (though I have bought them on occasion, as previously mentioned), but these were worse. Usually, starter boxes contain the first disc and room for the rest of the series (or sometimes half of the series), but since this was a long (feel free to add extra o's) series and they only put three episodes on each disc (usually, anyway) they essentially had "here's disc one and room for discs two through three, here's disc five, with room for discs six through eight," etc.

Took up a lot of space, didn't sell, and very likely made Best Buy even more wary of carrying multiple volumes of anything but the very top sellers.

Of course, FUNimation later proved that you can always get more stupid by remastering DBZ in tilt-and-scan.

I have no idea how Suncoast is doing in general, because in my area one Suncoast never went out of business, and the other closed and reopened. Neither appears to have reduced the amount of anime it carries (unlike the Best Buy--Damn you, FUNimation!). Then again, my area isn't exactly typical--there are two drive-in movie theaters within an hour's drive of each other (plus there are two Wal-Marts that sell Pocky).

Even $55 is a whole lot of money for one barebones release of a movie. Bandai Visual sure talks a big game about "Japanese quality releases in America," but I can't help but notice that the Japanese release has extra (useless) stuff that we didn't get.

It's barebones? Damn! The Patlabor DVD's were pricey, but at least they had some great extras (even if they were inexplicably missing the 2.0 soundtracks). Is Bandai Visual afraid of not failing quickly enough?

Regarding Sazae-san sticking with cels: While I think the producer's explanation is largely bovine excrement, he wasn't entirely off-base saying that people get a warm feeling while watching it. The minimal research I've done indicates that the show is repetitive and predictable, and the main reason people watch it is out of nostalgia. Best not to tamper with something that's been working for nearly fourty years, lest it lose its comfortable familiarity.

E. Bernhard Warg
Otakon Classic Video Track
Anime's Frank
"Lu-Lu-Lu Lu-Lu-Luu
Kyou mo ii tenki"

Régis said...

Daryl! Man, oh man, I wish text had intonation because the last thing I wanted to do was to piss you off or start a flame war. Quite the opposite! I TOTALLY agree with you, and better yet your example is perfect. In fact, in the Art of Spirited Away, Miyazaki talks about how they added texture and an amount of grain to the color, to give it more life. Again, I didn't really get the idea that you were a computer hater per se, but it just sounded like that the way things came out. So, yeah, no worries man, no need to be angry, cuz we're all on the same page on this one.

Anonymous said...

"It's barebones? Damn! The Patlabor DVD's were pricey, but at least they had some great extras (even if they were inexplicably missing the 2.0 soundtracks). Is Bandai Visual afraid of not failing quickly enough?"

It might not be Bandai Visual's fault, though. It's possible Manga's contract with Gainax kept them from getting the commentary for the R1 release. I mean, look how long it took for the license to the anime to expire. Anyway, I'm sure someone savvy enough will come up with a way to burn the track onto the current dvds.

Daryl Surat said...

Part 2 of Show 59, featuring the actual anime reviews (shock!) has now been posted. Have at it.

Also, the AWA schedule has been posted, and...well:

Sat -- 12:00 -- Panel -- Brayton -- 12pm Podcast AWO
Sat -- 12:00 -- Special -- Kennesaw -- 12pm Yamato Interview (Noburo Ishiguro interviewed by Tim Eldred)

I get the feeling that the few people present that actually care about seeing us are among the few people present who know who Noboru Ishiguro is and would very much like to hear from him. I don't know, just a hunch.

I'm thinking we either split up (bleah) or no-show our own panel. Other podcasters are going to be at AWA, but I get the feeling that they'd all want to check out Ishiguro as well, so I don't know if we could just hand the panel off.

Handwritten note on door stating "Everyone At The Podcasting Panel Would Much Rather Be In Kennesaw Right Now Instead, And So Should You" = PROBLEM SOLVED

halojones-fan said...

Back when Fast Karate did a rant about digital animation, I posted a comment on their message board about it; Dave said it summed up his position pretty well.

It's about the same amount of work to do great-looking animation, whether you use digital or "traditional" (i.e. hand-drawn) techniques. However, doing merely adequate animation is much easier with digital. So, when everyone used hand-drawn, the cost of doing "great" animation wasn't a big hit compared to the overall budget. However, if you're using digital, it's way more expensive to do "great" animation.

I'll make up some numbers, here, just for an example. Let's say that great animation costs 6, whether digital or hand-drawn. Adequate hand-drawn animation costs 4; Adequate digital animation costs 2.

If I'm using hand-drawn animation, I say: "I can do this adequately. If I want to do it great, then I need 50% more budget."

If I'm using digital animation, I say: "I can do this adequately. If I want to do it great, then I need 200% more budget. Also, for the cost of doing a great job, I can do three jobs that are adequate."

Which do you think some bright young B-school grad would choose?

ScottGreen said...

Via MangaBlog.net, "Authentic Mango" has a bunch of noteworthy bits of info about Tezuka manga releases, ect at http://tinyurl.com/2xjlg4

Jeff Tatarek said...

I am deliberately staying away from the second part of this episode as well as the "Buried Treasure" article until I get episode 8 of Lather's Blather posted.

I am curious--nay, terrified--to see how closely our opinions run on Robot Carnival.

Tim Brown said...

Actually, Tale of Two Robots was always my absolute favorite segment of Robot Carnival. When I saw it I wished (and even convinced myself) that there was more, and that it really was just one part of an existing anime movie. I'm a big fan of Yoshiyuki Sadamoto's older character designs too.

But I really need to see Robot Carnival again and see how wrong I was.

Also: Cloud reminded me of Megaman 2's ending.

"Oh! You mean, SYMBOLICALLY!"

Larson said...

Is it just me, or is DMP one of the most worthless manga companies out today? They've canceled nearly every non-BL mnanga series they've started. It's getting so that I feel why even bother with their releases, they're just gonna cancel them. Oh, and if you're really lucky, they'll tease you with an announcement at a con, and then announce that they're canceling the series. Sorry Robot fans.

scottgreen said...

I would classify DMP as a company that is very aware of their bottom line. Very corporate and unwilling to run a series at a loss. It's a shame that Worst and Barbie and Her Pink Gun didn't take off, but it's not exactly unexpected.

Heroes are Extinct is nothing brilliant, but is surprisingly fun.

Speaking of DMP, has anyone seen Pop Japan Travel: Essential Otaku Guide? I'd love to know the story behind why the counter-example character has the name and appearance of a prominent former employee.

Carl Horn said...

Dear Daryl,

If you have time on Sunday, it might be interesting to see if you could sit in on my Evangelion panel. Having a contrary opinion, and all that. Because otherwise it's going to consist of listening to the Hot Tears of Shame review on my laptop speakers while we all sip a mimosa. Well, I guess that will happen regardless.

Anonymous said...

scott: Thanks for the link, but what does "adaptions" mean?

" No. 5 is NEVER coming back. It is Viz's worst selling manga of all
time. Blue Spring also sold extremely poorly."

Not surprised about that, but I'm wondering why they didn't ask Viz about the Ping Pong manga.

"Reprints of the original Adolf series or Black Jack run are
impossible as their original runs pre-dated digitization."

I'm not sure what that means, but I'd rather have Adolf released unflipped, anyway.

"Phoenix still is a financial loss for Viz. This does not encourage
them to reprint Black Jack."

I don't really blame them, but they could easily say, "From the creator of Ode to Kirihito" for Black Jack. But I guess if there's enough demand for Princess Knight, and it becomes successful, Viz could try selling Black Jack through it.

Daryl Surat said...

Buy the way, what's a good way to record a podcast.

Take your pick!

No one cares about Paul Giamatti. I made a joke comparing him to Jude Law, but it's true.

I never heard of the guy until Shoot 'Em Up. That's therefore the only thing he is and ever will be to me.

it's a tough sell for people who thought Death Proof was "talky".

But Death Proof is talky. It's also something I have no desire to ever see again, least of all in standalone form like it is now, and from now on if I see Tracie Thorns or Zoe Bell with any sort of significant acting presence in something, I'm just flat-out not watching it because they really irritate me.

You know what that movie should have been about? Stuntman Mike (role model) and his Death Proof car. Not "everybody except Stuntman Mike" and "cars that are not the Death Proof car."

Anime's Frank

You continue to taunt me with this podcast link that links to no podcasts! One of these days...!

If you have time on Sunday, it might be interesting to see if you could sit in on my Evangelion panel. Having a contrary opinion, and all that.

I dare not say I can even halfway fill the shoes (or ego hat) of CB Smith, but sure. I'll be glad to throw myself to the wolves with my rampant ignorance!

Less than 48 hours remain in my deadly wager, and I have only received one $5 donation. I'm gonna win this.

Anonymous said...

One of these days I'll actually start my podcast.

No, really!

Maybe once the Overtime Approved period at work is over, followed, inevitably, by the Between Projects period...

E. Bernhard Warg
(No more links until I have at least one podcast up, even if it's just my "Buying Otaku USA" parody--THERE! Now I have some kind of impetus or something!)

Régis said...

Gerald: thanks for the heads up on the manga. The last time I saw a cup noodle reference in a manga was on Hiroaki Samura's Ohikkoshi which I highly recommend. It is nothing like Blade of the Immortal, except for the style, but it is hilarious in every way.

Dane Scaysbrook said...

I think Mao Lamdo (sometimes credited as Mao Lamdao) was a relatively popular artist in Hong Kong who also produced another short animated film; Gong Tau. It was kind of an experimental short animated horror film.

"Cloud" from Robot Carnival, was more or less based on Lamdao's illustrated book, "Snow and the Young Boy".

Anonymous said...

daryl: "But Death Proof is talky. It's also something I have no desire to ever see again, least of all in standalone form like it is now, and from now on if I see Tracie Thorns or Zoe Bell with any sort of significant acting presence in something, I'm just flat-out not watching it because they really irritate me."

Yeah, I hated it, too. In fact, it was the one time I ended up sitting through screaming babies and assholes who have to look at their over-priced cell phones for messages which they probably will never get.

>You know what that movie should >have been about? Stuntman Mike >(role model) and his Death Proof >car. Not "everybody except >Stuntman Mike" and "cars that are >not the Death Proof car."

But daryl, you just don't "get" the "genius" that is Tarantino.

Anonymous said...

ended up *enjoying*

Alexander Strange said...

As far as I know most doujin aren't porn, they're just college anime clubs making comics about Tony the Tiger beating up Captain Harlock or whatever.

Ryuukishi07's art is even worse than Takeshi Takeuchi's was in Tsukihime, too, so it's just as well they didn't have porn; the characters in Higurashi originally didn't even have fingers.

Behonkiss said...

Long Robot Carnival post ahead:

First off, thanks for reviewing this. Despite what you guys said, I found the review pretty informative even after finding as much info on the movie as I could. I knew very little about the directors on this besides Otomo, as well as Sci-Fi and TBS's bizarre scheduling for it. I'm also going to keep an eye out in case that art book ever pops up for sale/auction somewhere. (I did manage to find a trading card set brought out in the mid-90s, each of which had storyboards and concept art on the back. I might try and scan them sometime if anyone's interested.)

The bit about how anthologies always result in very different opinions is definitely true, as my opinions for the shorts are really different (I experienced this firsthand when my little sister visited, spotted the cards, and grew curious. I love Nightmare due to the nonstop collection of great robot designs and bizarre bits thrown at you, so I put it on. After 5 minutes and a very blank expression on her face, I turned it off.). Franken's Gears, A Tale of Two Robots and Nightmare are my favorites, Deprive and Presence are good, Starlight Angel is mediocre, and Cloud, while good as an art piece, is terrible as entertainment in my eyes. To be honest, it did seem kind of strange that you guys praised the movie so highly at the end when Starlight Angel seemed to be the only one you really praised.

Daryl commented on the download options for this, but I'm not sure if you're aware that somebody's put a torrent of either a foreign DVD or the laserdisc, with both Japanese and English tracks for the talkie shorts. It's a huge file due to being a DVD copy and not just a striaght AVI rip, but the quality is superb:
http://www.mininova.org/tor/747086

Also, just about all the shorts are up on YouTube, but Presence is the Japanese version with truly awful subtitles from the HK rip, which has to be a bootleg. The line about wanting to love a feminine woman? It's translated as "I hope my wife is 100% woman." And though the scientist in Two Robots yells his name as John Jack Volkerson III in English, it comes out as something like "Jimmy Paul Walker 3". I went and put the English version of Two Robots up, so anyone who wants an idea of how intentionally awful the voices were can check it out here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdOieEsk918

Lastly, and on the topic of the movie being old-school ink and paint, it still seems pretty easy to get cels at most con booths that sell them. At this year's Otakon, one place (I believe it's called Art Toons or something similar) had a couple of them, and while I would have loved to get an awesome medium shot of Red Neck from Nightmare, I was $20 short, so I got a cool shot of the Japanese machine from Two Robots, which I posted on my blog if you want to see it.

Looking forward to the next show, too. I'm really grateful that Apple was up for putting Tezuka on the store and even as a front page feature, and the Season Pass deals are unbelievable.

Tim Eldred said...

Just listened to part 2. Your description of Higurashi sounds a bit like one of my favorite movies, "Run Lola Run," which also does the multiple-path thing. Has anyone seen both to know how they compare beyond that concept?

Also, based on everything I saw in Tokyo last month, homemade doujinshi are OVERWHELMINGLY porn. 2/3 of everything at Comiket was porn and at least half of what I saw in stores was porn. At LEAST half. Oh, yeah, and absolutely none of it looked alike...

scottgreen said...

Both Run Lola Run and Higurashi are a bit iterative. I haven't seen all of Higurashi, but from the first half of the first season, characters seem to know the information discovered in former iteration. Higurashi is phrased as a mystery, and each divergent path reveals a bit more.

Where as Run Lola Run is a bit character driven and a bit chance driven, Higurashi is script driven. You see the author steering events down the different paths. It's more about speculating the destination and the truth behind the event than being invested in how the situation will shape up. And, it's also a count down to some grizzly event.

Anonymous said...

"Higurashi, gehst du einkaufen? Ich brauch Shampoo!"

E. Bernhard Warg
(...must...not...link...)

Tim Eldred said...

A grizzly event? Like with a huge bear biting and mauling people? Sounds rather grisly...

Gotcha!

Erwin Rosales said...

I have so many questions about the Astroboy 2003 series, I hope you all can answer them on the next podcast.

Also I can't wait for all your reviews for the OSamu Tezuka special episode 60.

p-trix said...

I don't know if this is already known, but if you search Tezuka on itunes music store several or all of his short films are on there.

Once again, fantastic show. Only thing I have to say is that it seems the voicemails are spliced into the show after without anyone commenting on them. Is it because you only really get voicemails which don't require responses? Just wondering!

James Leung Man-Fai said...

Tim, if you threw in some mercury contamination, you'll get Frankenheimer's Prophecy.

Chris Sobieniak said...

There's WAY too much for me to talk about for this episode! (just to let people know)

- Have to get myself a new HDTV set soon (only a year and a half before they'll bother to switch off the old analog channels in order to ruin my TV enjoyment of the past few decades!

- Big Dreams, Little Tokyo sounds interesting a film, and I had seen Lost in Translation at a cinema once and wasn't sure what to make of it, but I can agree with Gerald on it being about social disconnection with the main character in the film. This film might be something I want to share with my friend I've brought up now teaching English over in Kofu, Japan. Not sure if it's out in the indie circuit or not.

- Having checked up on that "Anime Bento Festival" thingy being done, it looks as if the closest theater that will play Cagliostro near me is 51 miles up in Livonia, MI, second closest is 70 miles south in Lima, OH (a city I don't expect this sort of thing to happen in). My town sucks (damn you National Amusements)!

Having checked up on "Tezuka Productions" over at the iTunes store, here's the shorts available for $1.99 each...
- Tale of a Street Corner (1962)
- Mermaid (1964)
- Drop (1965)
- Pictures at an Exhibition (1966)
- Jumping (1984)
- Broken Down Film (1985)
- Legend of the Forest (1987)
- Muramasa (1987)

I would probably suggest getting Street Corner, Pictures at an Exhibition and Legend of the Forest personally for their longer lengths to view over the number of YouTube versions of the other shorts currently available (never realized how many Jumping's there are now, I felt like I was the only one who ever knew of this 12 years ago when I came across it on a public library's VHS tape).

Still, this is just what I wanted to have happen to many indie animated short films I used to see often thrown on as 'filler' on Showtime in the 80's, since they hardly find a place to release them on DVD lately, iTunes is a nice alternative route to explore (also Video On Demand through cable systems).

- Funny hearing about New Generation Pictures wanting to get their dubs done in China nowadays. That's more ludicrous than the outsourcing seen in the animation industry for decades that still continues to happen despite the ease of digital technology (of which I'll talk about in the next paragraph).

- When I think about what I miss from the use of cels in animation, it would have to be that need to get your hands dirty by working in that medium. Editing film by hand was something I learned about in a high school film making class, from a teacher whom stressed the approaching use of computers that would forever takeover all aspects of film making we seen today. Only a shame I didn't take it too seriously then.

In some way, I miss seeing the usual flaws attribute to cel animation, such as the dirt, scratches, painting errors or other such things you don't see anymore in digital work today. One such thing often noticeable for me was to notice shadows often created by the cels not properly flatten when they're photographed, often showing a faint shadow behind the character on the right and left that might only noticeable in close-ups and all. Shows like South Park and recent seasons of The Simpsons have tried to emulate that look, but it doesn't have the feel of the real thing to me. Of course there's also the improper painting of cels that might show too much transparency of a color in some shots. Often this was due to the paints not being applied on thick enough, but I often notice this with the red color a lot personally, not as much opaque quality as to the others perhaps.

The proper term for the use of hand-drawn 2D digital animation would be "digital ink & paint", or as one Canadian animator I know would call it, the "DIP" process. :-)

Sazae-san's pretty boring indeed. I've seen some episodes of this, and it's pretty much what is said about it. Still funny they had been using cels for this long when the use of a 2D program like Retas! Pro would suffice, they just be giving dozens of cel painters the pink slip.

As an avid cel collector, I do kinda wonder if it was the fault of those studios for selling cels on their own for having the tax brought upon them in the process? The closest we've ever came to such a concept of a studio selling cels affordable in a convenient way would be the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cels that Toys R Us sold a decade ago. Regularly, the main studios might only release these works at established galleries or auctions for whatever bloated price tag they're asking, and aside from eBay, that's the best most of us can go with. At least I don't think the US government imposed a tax on their usage of cels, though the Japanese studios could've just washed their cels and reused them instead (thus, the cel collecting deal would've dried up)!

While getting the drawings themselves is OK, I often think getting the original roughs are far superior as opposed to the clean-up/finished drawings they would use for xeroxing/scanning that most would get with their cels.

Wonder how possible it could be for an animator's union of sorts to be formed in Japan in order to give the workers the treatment they deserve by these studios? Probably wouldn't fly at all (be kinda like Hollywood's "Animation Guild" if it might mean less creative control in the process).

And now...

ROBOT CARNIVAL!

It was produced by A.P.P.P. Co., Ltd. (an abbreviation for "Another Push Pin Planning), though the main producer of the production is Kazufumi Nomura and was released as an OVA in '87, and theatrically released in early '91 by Streamline Pictures in the US (English dub of course).

While I don't remember WTBS showing this or the few other Streamline titles mention, I did see them on Cartoon Network around '94 when they had a little thing going on that year (not sure if in the summertime or not) called "Saturday Japanime". That was my first exposure to Robot Carnival and was rather enthralled over the whole thing. I remember SciFi Channel's usage of RC's footage as 'filler' after some films in the days when they bothered to stick in animated shorts in a manner that evoked memories of HBO and Showtime's usage of animated short subjects in the 80's. While the entire Robot Carnival was shown on SciFi, for it's filler use, they would show the opening, possibly "Deprive" came next, and then the end of the film itself with the end credits, just so they had that 10-15 minutes before the next show came up.

I usually consider "Robot Carnival" a primer for anyone getting into understanding and viewing Japanese animation to get a taste of the different styles and stories it could tell.

In the case of how it was arranged, the original OVA release was how Daryl has described it. For Streamline's home video release, which might have been seen in the theaters as well, the segemnts were in this order...

1. Opening
2. Starlight Angel
3. Cloud
4. Deprive
5. Franken's Gears
6. Presence
7. Tale of Two Robots
8. Nightmare
9. Ending

I personally like the Monty Pythonesque quality of the Opening/Ending's "ROBOT CARNIVAL" menace! Never thought about it being terrible due to it's beautiful nature.

I did create an MKV file of this film I put together myself with Japanese, English and French audio tracks (don't ask), plus English subtitles as accurate to those two segments as I could find. I think my copy is far more definite to most others for the moment.

Deprive is one of those I wasn't too big into due to his premise and Totally 80's type action that was a breeze to sit through in this, so I don't have much to say here about it.

Not knowing about Umetsu's later work, "Presence" on it's own was one of my fav segments in this whole thing, but I can see how the pattern was. Guy marries working gal, guy gets no satisfaction in marriage, guy builds robot feminine women, robot girl gets a mind of her own, guy gives her the smackdown. Also used to bug me seeing this guy eventually going through decades of guilt for not having the nerve to be with that robot doll before it was too late (of course today they would go the otaku/moe crap and stick in a sex scene if this short was done today).

Starlight Angel's usage as the first segment in Streamline's release might be seen as an appetizer to this film, much like Fantasia's "Toccata en Fugue". Of course Kitazune also did the character designs in Megazone 23 THE THIRD. Don't want to spoil the end of this one with the robot employee itself (needless to say I didn't expect nothing more or less out of that). :-)

Cloud is the most "out of left field" in this compilation. It reminded me more of what to expect to see in a standard film festival's offering of different films of different genres and formats. I don't really have much to say for it, but it is quite arty and slow. As someone already pointed out, Mao Lamdao apparently has had other work to do besides this. Just too bad there isn't a proper webpage out there for him.

Incidentally, the original title for "Tale of Two Robots" translates to "Strange Tale of Meiji Machines: Episode of the Red-Haired Man's Invasion". I personally wasn't too nutty with the Japanese voice for Volkerson that was done by James R. Bowers (probably some gaijin they got off the street for that). I personally enjoyed the Streamline voice acting here for trying to play off the audience expectations of the Japanese despite the obvious. Being reminded one thing that I didn't figure out for a long time was a book Volkerson had near him when he piloted his robot was a book that had the usual illegible scribbles on it, but subtitled in the Japanese version was the title "The Travels of Marco Polo". Just thought I'd bring that up. :-)

"Nightmare"'s original title translates to "Chicken Man and Red Neck". Pretty much this film is a combination of Fantasia's "Night on Bald Mountain" and the "Legend of Sleepy Hallow" story from "The Adventures if Ichabod and Mr. Toad".

As I said before, this was released on VHS in the 90's from Streamline (though a cheap ED-recorded copy was made available from Best Film & Video too). For those that might be able to get it, there's the US LaserDisc release from Lumivision which does contain the Japanese audio for Presence and Tale of Two Robots on the digital channel. A copy is currently being sold on eBay as we speak...
http://cgi.ebay.com/ROBOT-CARNIVAL-Laserdisc-LD-ANIME-VERY-GOOD-AND-RARE_W0QQitemZ200152583094QQihZ010QQcategoryZ381QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Aside from that 1999 DVD release in Japan, an R3 was said to have been released in Korea in 2004. I think this version is one that is often getting released around the black market and on the internet as it contains Korean subs along with the English dubtitles. And yes, a new Blu-Ray release for Robot Carnival would be great if that ever happens.

Incidentally, someone over at Stage6 did stick the entire thing up anyway so I don't have to say anymore than stick in this link to it!
http://stage6.divx.com/Radom-Anime/video/1425888/Robot-Carnival-(1987)
(go on, you know you wanna!)


END

P.S. Oh, and I need to pick up the Project X: Cup Noodle and Seven Eleven manga soon, those titles intrigue me to "read more about it!" (a faint reference to CBS if anyone remembers that)

Garry said...

The 16-year-old me used to shit up the internets with endless rants about how fansubbing was going to rape the industry to death someday. It pisses me off to see that little punk get something right (even if by accident.)

I think we're seeing a perfect storm right now: a weak US dollar, increasing ghettoization of genre (Sevakis put it well: fewer Triguns and more fringe titles mean fewer buyers,) the overnight collapse of the video retailer and the explosion in illegal digital distribution. This is a Sonny Liston-sized right hand headed direct for the jaw of our favorite little medium.

I'll keep my chin up and see if this just royally fucks up Hellsing Ultimate production. God, wouldn't that be grand?

Almost makes me wish I was 16 again, so I could get all worked up over it.

Gilles Poitras said...

On the shift to digital from hand painted cells. I have never heard the tax explaination. After all cll sales were taxable from the beginning.

The major reason was that in the later 1990s the Japanese film industry stopped making animation cells. The companies then had to import them from the US at a much higher price. This had a further expense in that both the companies and the subcontractors, who often handled the actual painting, had to invest in computers and train staff to use them.

As for Project X the TV show was on innovators not just on business. The episodes on the construction of Tokyo Tower, the struggle to establish a market for soy sauce in the US and the development of the magnetic strip card for transit systems were interesting to watch. I saw them on Ch 26 here in the San Francisco Bay Area during the Saturday night susbtitled Japanese show slot.

By the way the 7-11 book is on 7-11 Japan not the company as a whole.

Erwin Rosales said...

Does anyone know if the 25$ were collected?

TJ said...

The plot thickens...

The ADV/Geneon distribution deal has apparently been cancelled. I wonder what this means for the future of Geneon...

Anonymous said...

I'm hoping their library gets cannibalized, so that we can get cheaper dvds. I have a feeling that won't happen with Patlabor WXIII, though, so get it before BV makes it even more expensive.

Steve Harrison said...

According to Daryl's 'away' message, the $25 was indeed obtained. I expect comedy.

Just like the whole ADV/Geneon thing.

Anonymous said...

So Yakuza 2 is out in the U.S. next year, and I'm a happy camper.

Anonymous said...

Even $55 is a whole lot of money for one barebones release of a movie. Bandai Visual sure talks a big game about "Japanese quality releases in America," but I can't help but notice that the Japanese release has extra (useless) stuff that we didn't get.

What are you talking about? I have both the Japanese R2 Release Blu-Ray and the American R1 Release Blu-Ray it's the exact same thing. Heck, the R2 even came with english subtitles.

Juan said...

great review on robot carnival, got interested in watching it. and i just wanted to say that i bought Giant Robo at best buy for less than $20 bucks and its amazing and whant to thank you for that and i also got tetsujin 28 wich is also really good and thank you so much for turning me on to this


THANK YOU

Daryl Surat said...

The bad news: I was not able to go to the nerd prom and get videos of me dancing with the Ouran crew. I have an excuse: they were all an hour late, and by that time I got a phone call saying to go to dinner with Noboru Ishiguro. As a result, I get to interview him in 45 minutes. This will get posted.

So I'm sorry there's no immense nerd prom jokes involving me. I can refund the money to people should they ask.

TJ said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
TJ said...

A 45 minute interview with Noboru Ishiguro!? Daryl, you're my hero! This is lightyears better than any nerd prom jokes

Anonymous said...

"I have both the Japanese R2 Release Blu-Ray and the American R1 Release Blu-Ray it's the exact same thing. Heck, the R2 even came with english subtitles."

So maybe that commentary was an LD- exclusive which got placed on the original import dvd to sell more copies? The Japanese do occasionally get screwed on R2 releases, too. I remember a Geneon rep telling me they couldn't get a certain song on the home video release of Akazukin Cha Cha.

Anonymous said...

I'm kinda tempted to get that Megazone collection announced at AOD, even though I'm not a big fan. I just wanna finish it, I guess. I'd rather someone just release a domestic CD of the music, though, cus that's mostly what I liked.

exedore said...

Some anonymous bugger wrote: What are you talking about? I have both the Japanese R2 Release Blu-Ray and the American R1 Release Blu-Ray it's the exact same thing. Heck, the R2 even came with english subtitles.

So you paid $80+ twice for identical discs and did so voluntarily? You, sir, have far too much money, and should consider subsidizing my master's degree.

Carl Horn said...

>>The major reason was that in the later 1990s the Japanese film industry stopped making animation cells.

I've heard that, too, but I've also never heard the business reasons behind that. Cels are fairly simple to make after all (more simple than, say, photographic film, which is still made in Japan) and I assume clear acetate can still be found in other Japanese products. And it can't have been due to a lack of customer demand, what with the post-Evangelion surge in anime production.

Anonymous said...

Anyone wanna write a petition to free John McTiernan?

Chris Sobieniak said...

Daryl Surat said...
The bad news: I was not able to go to the nerd prom and get videos of me dancing with the Ouran crew. I have an excuse: they were all an hour late, and by that time I got a phone call saying to go to dinner with Noboru Ishiguro. As a result, I get to interview him in 45 minutes. This will get posted.


I am proud of you! Banzai!

Carl Horn said...
I've heard that, too, but I've also never heard the business reasons behind that. Cels are fairly simple to make after all (more simple than, say, photographic film, which is still made in Japan) and I assume clear acetate can still be found in other Japanese products. And it can't have been due to a lack of customer demand, what with the post-Evangelion surge in anime production.


True, you would think they would still be able to manufacture a product if there was still an interest or an after-market for such an item. It's not like what happened when Sanford discontinued the "Blackwing 602" pencils here on account of the inability to produce eraser clips for the ferrules, making all the pissy animators spend hundreds to thousands of dollars for any old stock they could get their hands on via eBay to still hold on to that decades old tradition they love. (again, I ramble on for nothing)

But again, there wouldn't be anything to stop some Japanese manufacturer from not producing cellulose acetate sheets if there was still a studio demand for it, even if only for non-production related items like limited-edition work (which I hardly see much of in anime).

Gerald said...

But again, there wouldn't be anything to stop some Japanese manufacturer from not producing cellulose acetate sheets if there was still a studio demand for it, even if only for non-production related items like limited-edition work (which I hardly see much of in anime).

I'd always heard it was the business reasons that made it not viable. But from what I remember reading in The Nontenki Memoirs, it seemed that clear cellulose acetate sheets could be bought from your local industrial manufacturer (actually the guys in the book got the wrong type of plasic which didn't allow paint to stick, but that's not the purpose here). It seems like if a studio now has to pay more money for a show in taxes whether they produce it one way or another would affect their decision, but our interview with Noboru Ishiguro confirmed our thoughts on the whole cel thing in that it's largely used, not to achieve special effects and greater detail, but to cut budgets.

Speaking of which, man, I'm pretty sure I could have talked to Ishiguro for, easily, six hours and not gotten everything out of the man I wanted to. The guy is an encyclopedia of knowledge and anecdotes.

Rheinhard said...

FYI, I have put up the introductory bio for Ishiguro shown at opening ceremonies on my youtube page, if anyone wishes to check it out.

Anonymous said...

gerald: Did you ask him if he saw Stealth yet, or if he had heard any news on the Starblazers movie from Disney? He really seemed shocked about the latter when I told him, although he tried to play it off as adding a different perspective to an old concept.

Gerald said...

...or if he had heard any news on the Starblazers movie from Disney?

Is that the same movie I heard rumored in 1994? The same one that said there was a scale model of the Yamato/Argos in the Arizona desert? If it is, then I thought that was very old news.

Tim Eldred said...

If there ever is a Star Blazers movie (which is unlikely) it almost certainly won't be done by Disney since they sat on their script until the 10-year development deal expired. Now it's available to other studios again. Will one of them bite? Never know.

Mr. Ishiguro very generously participated in an all-Yamato panel at AWA that I'm starting to write up for Otaku USA, and his AWO interview taught us all a lot. There are well-known people in anime who do sporadic projects, and then there are lesser-known people upon whom the entire industry relies. Ishiguro is in the latter category.

Stay tuned for some fascinating info...

Plaid Knight said...

So, are you guys going to discuss what the disappearance of Geneon will mean for the anime community?

Anonymous said...

gerald: It's old news, but it got mentioned again a while back, so I guess it's still happening. And it was gonna be the U.S.S. Arizona in the American version.

plaid: Cheaper discs, hopefully.

Chris Sobieniak said...

Gerald said...
I'd always heard it was the business reasons that made it not viable. But from what I remember reading in The Nontenki Memoirs, it seemed that clear cellulose acetate sheets could be bought from your local industrial manufacturer (actually the guys in the book got the wrong type of plasic which didn't allow paint to stick, but that's not the purpose here). It seems like if a studio now has to pay more money for a show in taxes whether they produce it one way or another would affect their decision, but our interview with Noboru Ishiguro confirmed our thoughts on the whole cel thing in that it's largely used, not to achieve special effects and greater detail, but to cut budgets.


Of course, so obvious!

~ Speaking of which, man, I'm pretty sure I could have talked to Ishiguro for, easily, six hours and not gotten everything out of the man I wanted to. The guy is an encyclopedia of knowledge and anecdotes.

You should've!

matt allen said...

Vis has officially announced that Death Note will premiere on Adult Swim on October 20th in the midnight time slot.

Anonymous said...

Sorry but, if the episode is already recorded then WHERE THE HELL is it? I know you all have a busy schedule, but... I'm kind of dying, here. And I think am I going insane to boot. (I had a dream last night that I was listening to one of your shows on my iPod. Come on, guys. Please.)

Anonymous said...

BTW, the Imaginasian stuff is finally for sale at Rightstuf. I recommend Orguss myself...

Erwin Rosales said...

I hope they are ok, hopefully they will release the episode by thrusday the next week :P

Gerald said...

http://www.narutotrek.com/

That's why the show's late, just experience the page.

Jaime/Karasuhebi said...

They're fine. I just saw Clarissa and Gerald this past Wednesday and IIRC, they said they hadn't started editing episode 60 yet. So yeah, nothing happened to them, they've just been busy.

Calm down people, you will get your aWo fix soon. :-P

-Jaime

Young Freud said...

I swear I remember hearing that the Disney Star Blazers film was an elaborate practical joke done by Bruce Lewis on the USENET crowd. I'll have to ask him the next time I see him, but I swear it was at least a joke.

Anonymous said...

I'm beginning to wonder if that Battle Angel movie ain't a joke! My theory is that Jimmy is really just holding the anime hostage, because he wants people to give Dark Angel a second chance. He doesn't want to be remembered as a guy who wasn't really that great a filmmaker, unless he was able to work with a big celebrity, or a recognized franchise. [I mean, seriously, Abyss was fucking boring!] It most likely stems from his bitterness in having to compensate Harlan Ellison for plagiarism.

Anonymous said...

Another head-slapping moment from Emile Hirsh and http://www.aintitcool.com/node/34246 : Mathew Fox and a live chimpanzee in half of the scenes. It’s colorful. It’s comedic. It’s crazy and very, very close to the spirit of the cartoon, but people inevitably are going to expect something like THE MATRIX, because that’s really what they know the Wachowskis for, other than BOUND, but they’re going to be so shocked when they just see this totally, totally different world and the cars are dope, dude. I mean, the cars are crazy and they’re all different, like different designs and different art on them. There’s one car that’s got a Japanese, like, Yakuza tattoo across the car. It’s crazy.

Anonymous said...

Omg that narutotrek thing totally blew my mind.

Erwin Rosales said...

Wait, is that convention for real?

Keith said...

You guys should talk more about Dragonball. Have you ever heard of it? Shit is awesome! It's about these dudes named Gozer and Vegetable who have to collect these magic eggs that will make them better fighters. I can't believe you haven't heard of it. You people don't know anything about TRUE ANIME.

PS - Afro Samurai is also awesome.

Popcorn Samurai said...

Is there any chance of a fan sub version of Satsuma. I would be willing to buy the imported volumes if there was a translation that I could print up. And I am not talking about a "Scanlation" just a translation that I would match up with the bubbles myself like it used to be (so we could still buy the books and support the artist/publisher).

Steve Harrison said...

It wasn't the Star Blazers movie that Bruce spoofed up, it was Babylon 5 the Anime series.

He did up this whole thing and really got a bunch of B5 fandom all in an uproar...I thought it was pretty well done and better than the last half of the 4th season and all of the fifth, but then again I'm a cranky old SF fan :)

(and you B5 fans, don't get your panties in an uproar. I don't blame JMS for falling down so much as I do Warner Bros for their dicking around)

Sadly, most everything you've ever heard about the Star Blazers live movie is true. It would have been a horrible, horrible trainwreck. I think we're lucky, very lucky that the project never got traction.

sequitur said...

Manabu Oohashi, credited as Mao Lamdo in Robot Carnival, is in fact a well respected veteran animator. He has had a very long career, from Cyborg 009 to Metropolis, covering four decades. He's responsible for the excellent opening and ending of "Treasure Island", but is probably best known for doing a memorable and critical acclaimed Gekiga-style episode of "Tensai Bakabon.

Anonymous said...

BTW, the Blade Runner: Final Cut's playing in limited release this weekend.

Anonymous said...

Speaking of half-assed anime adaptations... Found http://www.chud.com/index.php?type=news&id=12002
off Dark Horizons...

Keith said...

"Dragon Ball: The Magic Begins" -- from the makers of the fantasy film "12 Animals." Made in 1989, starring a cast of nobodies except for Don Wong Dao, who wa sa pretty cool kungfu film star in the 70s and 80s. And man is the movie awful. badmovies.org managed to get through to the end, which is more than I ever did:

http://www.badmovies.org/movies/dragonball/

Joe said...

Just some stuff about Geneon. I've always known it would come to something like this with them. The way they did things, I wondered how they made money. It's not just one thing, but more a combination of everything. They didn't really have a blockbuster title for a long stretch of time, and when something like Hellsing Ultimate came along, it was too late. Haibane-Renmei and Last Exile were probably some of their better sellers, but they weren't a, say, Naruto or Bleach. However, it wasn't just they didn't have a blockbuster, but they licensed or their company made titles that couldn't have been cheap and probably sold next to nothing. The Melody of Oblivion, for example. Something like 4 companies were behind that thing including Gainax, so it was probably EXPENSIVE just to license the thing. Now raise your hand if you bought this series. Did they even try to make it look like an APPEALING series to pick up? I know the only reason I saw the whole thing was I got TWO free copies given to me. I guess random people posing on the cover doesn't really sell titles. I like it well enough when I actually watched it despite its creepy/retarded aspects, but that's beside the point. Geneon's catalog is littered with titles like these. And titles like Texhnolyze and Ergo Proxy which they had a hand in making had to cost a pretty penny considering the talent they had and how good they look, but probably didn't sell NEARLY enough to cover.

But the Melody of Oblivion thing brings me to another point. They didn't SELL their titles. Very few of their ads made their titles look appealing. They're very basic, gave simple images of their series, maybe gave an idea of what genre it was in, and perhaps a pull quote from a magazine/Internet site. In comparison, Bandai Ent. gives very visual ads that make even a piece of shit like Avenger look good, ADV has good ads that make the series sound cool and uses gimmicks that tend to work. The only things that sold for Geneon were things that sold themselves through either previous popularity or word of mouth like Hellsing Ultimate. And did even R.O.D. the TV do that well?

The same thing goes for their music branch. They have some great CDs in their catalog. I own a lot of them. But they also have the second OST to soundtracks where maybe two people bought the first OST. And random things like the soundtrack to Doki Doki School Hour (On both DVD and CD) don't help. Plus, considering they couldn't even keep their web site updated, I'm sure very few people know about what they really had. Did you know they have a domestic release of a Yoko Kanno CD in their collection? The soundtrack to Arjuna. Now the series isn't exactly a household name even to anime geeks, but I'm sure even if you slapped, "THIS IS A YOKO KANNO CD, BITCHES!" somewhere, ANYWHERE, SOMEONE would get the message. That's not to mention all the Maaya Sakamoto Single Collections they sell have all the music done by Kanno with little mention of it.

There are other factors, like piracy and their penchant for overpricing things without having cheap boxsets, but really, if you don't have titles that sell, can't sell them through marketing, and have a bunch of them that cost a bit of money, the question has to be asked: HOW ARE THEY MAKING THEIR MONEY? I'm a person who only had to take a single math class for college requirements and absolutely NO business classes and even I can see this. Perhaps there were packaged deals and stuff behind the scenes to lower the cost, but this was coming eventually.

I don't mean to be so hard on Geneon. Every time I've talked to them, they've been more than cordial and personable. At big cons, they've brought guests that made the cons better and enhanced the atmosphere immensely. They love what they do, and it cannot be stated enough that there are very few industries that are run with so much love than the American anime industry. I can even tell when they brought over things just because they liked them and wanted to share it with America. Sometimes love isn't enough, though. Sad. The ADV deal made sense. If you can't sell your titles, have someone who can help you. This isn't a sign of complete collapse. Sometimes, there are simply harsh doses of reality that have to be taken. Unfortunately, this time, it was the company that backed yoshitoshi ABe's projects, and have given me some of the best things I have ever watched. Shame.

Joe said...

And random things like the soundtrack to Doki Doki School Hour (On both DVD and CD) don't help.

To clarify, I meant they had the SERIES on DVD, not the soundtrack. I suck at proofreading.

Anonymous said...

joe: Geneon always had crappy titles-not just a few years ago. For example, I don't know anyone who managed to sit through an episode of Armitage III, Kishin Corps, or The Hakkenden. About the only thing they were buying was Tenchi, and that's because they either never heard of UY, or chose to overlook it, because of its age. So I'd say the company's first mistake was letting FUNimation have the rest of Tenchi, because you don't give away a cash-cow like without a fight.

The next mistake was trying to piggy-back ADV's licenses. ADV gets Evangelion, so Geneon gets Lain, ADV gets Sister Princess, Geneon gets Koikaze. It was ridiculous, especially since Geneon would try to buy three titles like ADV's titles, in hopes that one would sell.

And you can be as hard as you want, because they were annoying jerks in their refusal to release Dog of Flanders uncut, when it probably would have cost them a lot less than Doki Doki School Hours. Plus, they knowingly sold crappy Toei dvds without even trying to offer a replacement like Illumitoon. So I'm over them.

VZ said...

I only have two things from Geneon. Strawberry Marshmallow and New Getter Robo (wow, that's a huge contrast if I ever saw one).

Actually, I've been on a kick and trying to watch all of the Go Nagai super robot remakes (Mazinkaiser, Mazinkaiser VS Daishogun, Shin Getter Robo VS Neo Getter Robo & New Getter Robo) I've only seen one ep of Getter Robo Armageddon. Did ADV lose its license to that cause the box set to that is hard to find.

Anyway, good luck for show 60 and beyond.

Anonymous said...

vz: I'm still waiting for Hanappe Bazooka on dvd myself...

VZ said...

Hmmn, never heard that one so I just checked ANN.

I tend to be a person of contrasts when it comes to anime. I like 80's anime and some of the new stuff made now but not so much inbetween (the 90's had some good stuff, don't get me wrong). Also I can either like really cutesy adorable comedy (Lucky star, Strawberry Marhmallow and Azumanga Daioh) and hard edge mecha anime (Zeorymer, M.D. Geist, New Getter Robo).

Oh please please PLEASE discuss Lucky Star down the road. Weither or not you guys liked it or hated it. That tends to be the attidude for the series. Those first 8 minutes of the girls just talking about which was the "head" on a chocolate cornet, turned off alot of people and some parts of 4chan don't even want to discuss it.

Erwin Rosales said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Erwin Rosales said...

VZ: vs: Well MD Geist is not mecha. Also you can find the Getter Robo Armagedon on ebay for pretty cheap.
Shin Getter Robo vs Neo Getter Robo is not licensed here in america I recomend a digisub, but in my opinion is the weakes of all getters.
If you enjoy manly shows I recommend to watch Kotetsu Shin Jeeg, and G Gundam (cuz is one of the best gundams out there)

VZ said...

Hey Daryl, did you see this OP yet?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rzub9D_UVfg

Komodo no Jikan (Children's Time) a.k.a the anime version of the manga "Nymphet" that was going to be brought over but cancelled.

They're not even trying to hide the pedoness of this one folks. You even see Pedobear at the end of the OP.

Oh and yes for future shows I hope you guys at AWO review more 80's OVA.

Mahlon said...

You three need to talk about Tokyopop's new Pop Fiction line and, more importantly, the releases of the Twelve Kingdoms and Kino no Tabi novels.

I want your opinions. Badly.

I purchased the Twelve Kingdoms volume one and I am about to buy the first of Kino, and I want to know if you think some of the translations are a little hard to go through like I do. And what the deal is with Kino being in paperback, but Twelve being in (my preffered choice of) hardback? Irritating, irritating Tokyopop. Don't make the otaku more angry with you than they already are...

... But I'm so happy their doing it. T_T

Mahlon said...

they're*

Consider this post a bump... I have to fix my typos, sorry.

Anonymous said...

So the new Boondocks is on the AS site, and man is it a great season opener!